Tag Archives: American Heart Association

New York City Campaign Asks If You’re Pouring On The Pounds

Pouring On The PoundsIt seems like in no time at all Sugar has gone from the perceived image of being completely harmless to two major blows within the course of a week. Last week the American Heart Association warned of the dangers of too much sugar consumption citing that Americans should not consume more than 6 teaspoons of sugar in a day for women and 9 teaspoons of sugar in a day for men. This week the Department of Health and Mental Hygiene for New York City has launched a campaign targeting the dangers of consuming too much sugar from liquid sources such as soft drinks, sports drinks, and sweetened iced teas. The campaign is called “Pouring On The Pounds” and features some aggressively graphic imagery of a sugary beverage being poured into a glass, however before the liquid hits the glass, it’s become a “glob” of fat.

The campaign asks “Are You Pouring On The Pounds?” and then recommends replacing the sugar loaded beverages with water, seltzer, or low-fat milk as a substitute. The heart of the campaign is definitely the visual as their ads feature a soda bottle shaped a lot like a Coca-Cola bottle, a sports drink bottle that resembles Gatorade, and a sweetened iced tea that looks a lot like Snapple. Obviously they can’t show the brands, but are trying to aim for ones you can identify from the shapes of their bottles. The gross image of the fat in the glass, conveniently overflowing out of the glass is very powerful. The image seems to be designed to get people to pay attention to what they’re drinking. It’s all to easy to forget about the liquids we drink in a day when taking a look at how much sugar we consume in a day. Most people can easily see the foods we eat as a source, but liquids we tend to forget because we don’t always see them as food too.

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American Heart Association Declares Sugar As Dangerous

SugarYesterday, the American Heart Association (AHA) released a scientific statement recommending the reduction of added sugar consumption indicating that there is a high correlation of metabolic abnormalities, adverse health conditions, and shortfalls in essential nutrients with excessive sugar intake. This marks the first time the AHA has recommended specific limits on the consumption of added sugars according to an article posted on the AHA’s website (Click here to read it.) If you are person who normally eats food containing  significant amounts of sugar then we recommend contacting your Doctor, you can look at this site to get a few recommendations.

According the AHA, Americans are consuming on the average 22 teaspoons (approx 108 grams) of sugar per day, and it is recommending that women should have no more than 6 teaspoons (approximately 30 grams) of sugar and men no more than 9 teaspoons (approximately 44 grams) of sugar. The AHA also tries to make a distinction between naturally occurring sugars such as those found in fruits and vegetables with highly processed sugars such as refined sugars and syrups indicating the more highly processed sugars are linked to the rise of obesity, as well as high blood pressure, high triglyceride levels, in addition to higher risk for heart disease, stroke, and inflammation.

The biggest culprit for the high amounts of the processed sugar occurring in the American diet are soft drinks and other sugar sweetened beverages. To put this into perspective, a 12 ounce can of Coca-Cola possess 39 grams of sugar. This exceeds the daily recommendation for women and doesn’t leave much room for more sugar for men according to the AHA’s recommended sugar guidelines. A 20 ounce bottle of Coca-Cola has 69 grams of sugar, more than double the recommended sugar level for women and more than 20 grams more sugar than recommended for me.

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Bee Gees Stayin’ Alive Really Does Save Lives

Bee Gees Stayin' AliveWho knew the Bee Gees song “Stayin’ Alive” really can help people stay alive? Well apparently it can, in a procedure known as “Hands Only CPR” which instead of using a more traditional mouth to mouth recussitation requires pressing hard and fast on the chest of the victim of cardiac arrest (or heart attack). This has been proven to be equally as effective as traditional CPR according to the American Heart Association and can double the vitim’s chances of survival.

The reason “Stayin’ Alive” by the Bee Gees song is effective is because it has over 100 beats per minute and Hands Only CPR is most effective at 100 beats per minute. The American Heart Association still encourages traditional CPR if you’re knowledgeable in how to do it, but the Hands Only CPR method is better than not doing anything at all, which is unfortunately, what happens in a lot of cases because people panic and fearing doing anything might make the situation worse for the victim. Sadly it’s the inaction that ultimately causes more death because people fear you need formal CPR training to help someone having a heart attack.

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